CZECHOSLOVAKIAN VLCAK CLUB OF AMERICA

An American Kennel Club® national breed club. Established 2011.

Czechoslovakian Vlcak Breed Information

In the United States...

In the United States, there are 208 living, pedigreed Czechoslovakian Vlcaks in 29 states (March 2014). The first, unofficial gathering of Czechoslovakian Vlcaks and their owners took place amongst 7 owners and 6 Vlcaks in the summer of 2008, in Wintergreen, Virginia. The Czechoslovakian Vlcak has been recorded in the American Kennel Club (AKC) Foundation Stock Service (FSS) since 2001 and is in the Working Group. Czechoslovakian Vlcaks have been able to compete in AKC Companion Events since January 1, 2010. The Czechoslovakian Vlcak has been recognized by the UKC since 2006. The first UKC Championship Title awarded to a Czechoslovakian Vlcak was given in 2009. The first litter was bred in the United States in 2009.

The Czechoslovakian Vlcak (CSV) was originally bred for working border patrol (tracking and apprehension) in Czechoslovakia in the 1950s.

The first impression of the Czechoslovakian Vlcak is an animal that is of a firm type in structure, above average size, and with a rectangular frame.

In the year 1955 a biological experiment took place in the CSSR of that time, namely, the crossing of a German Shepherd Dog with a Carpathian Wolf.

The Czechoslovakian Vlcak is a hardy and healthy breed. However, health testing should be a priority for all owners, especially those who are planning to breed.

Temperament

Czechoslovakian Vlcaks are extremely loyal to their family (including children, with proper supervision and socialization). They are suspicious and aloof towards strangers. Early socialization and training is very important. The CSV is fearless and courageous. They are highly intelligent, versatile and curious – with proper training Vlcaks can excel in many different types of activities. CSV are obedient with quick reactions and highly energetic. They need lots of daily exercise and stimulation to prevent destructive behavior. CSV can have a dominant and independent personality. They may have prey drive towards small animals. The CSV is not recommended for first time owners.

Appearance

Czechoslovakian Vlcaks should resemble the Carpathian Wolf in appearance – lean, weatherproof, courageous in expression. Males should be over 25.5 inches and at least 57 pounds, females over 23.5 inches and at least 44 pounds. Yellow gray or silver gray (wolf gray) are preferred colors, dark grey is also acceptable. Light, chest, belly and underside of legs, black tip on tail. Black nails. Face has a light, expressive mask with black lips and nose. Small, erect triangular ears. Eyes are yellow to amber, dark brown is penalized, all other colors are a disqualification. Large white teeth with a full, scissor bite. CSVs pace at slow speeds. They have a long, ground-covering, swift trot, and are tenacious canterers. Feet should remain close to ground, with neck carried forward and tail held straight down, or raised in a “sickle” shape (not curled) when excited. Thick coat but differs in summer and winter when a thick undercoat is present. Heavy shedders, similar to a German Shepherd Dog.

Fun Facts

The breed is also known as the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, the Ceskoslovensky Vlciak (Slovakia), the Ceskoslovensky Vlcak (Czech Republic) – or in short, the CSV. The average litter size is 6-7 puppies. The breed was created by breeding approximately 40 working line German Shepherd Dogs with 4 Carpathian wolves: Argo, Brita, Lejdy, and Sarik. The breed was recognized by the FCI in Europe in 1998, with Slovakia as the governing country for the breed standard. Czechoslovakian Vlcaks generally love water and snow. Most litters are born in the winter. Many Czechoslovakian Vlcaks pass endurance tests in which they run beside a bicycle – the longest test is 60 miles (100 km), run in 8 hours! Many females come into heat after their first birthday, and only once a year after that. Some Czechoslovakian Vlcaks howl and others make many other vocalizations besides barking. Although some CSV do bark, barking can be a difficult command to teach!